Brexit and Handelsbanken plc

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The UK left the European Union (EU) on 31st January 2020. Until 31st December 2020 the UK is in a transition period and the arrangements in respect of trade and business between the EU and the UK continue to apply.

Handelsbanken plc remains committed to giving our customers personal service and trusted advice. Our aim is to continue to provide the best possible service to our customers as this is very important to us. 

If you are a Handelsbanken customer living in the UK the service you receive from Handelsbanken plc will remain unchanged after the end of the transition period.

If you are a Handelsbanken customer living in the UK and receive services from Handelsbanken outside the UK (i.e. Handelsbanken AB), these services may be affected after the end of the transition period; should this be the case, we will contact you directly.

If you are a Handelsbanken customer living in the European Economic Area (EEA)*, including UK expat residents of a country in the EEA, we will contact you directly if we do not think we will be able to continue to provide you with banking services due to the regulations of the country in which you now reside.

You can find out more about the implications of Brexit on your financial affairs by reading “How Brexit could affect you”Opens in a new window from the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) and also “Consumer Guide on Retail Banking in the European Union after Brexit”Opens in a new window by UK Finance. 

If you have any queries or concerns about the impact of the end of the transition period on your arrangements with Handelsbanken plc please contact your branch for further information.

*The European Economic Area (EEA )

The EEA consists of the following EU countries: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Republic of Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain and Sweden. In addition, Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway are also members of the EEA despite not being in the EU. This allows them to be part of the EU single market. 

Switzerland is neither a member of the EU or the EEA but is part of the EU single market.